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Indiana University Bloomington

Department of Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design College of Arts and Sciences

New & Special Courses

Fall 2013 | Spring 2014

Fall 2013 Offerings:

AMID-R490 International Fashion Consumer: Retailers (3 Credit Hours)
Fall

Professor Sharron Lennon

International Fashion Consumer: Retailers will focus on global and country specific factors that impact distribution systems for and consumption of fashion related products. In this course, students will develop an understanding of consumers of fashion products within a global context and motivations for pursuing a global marketing and retailing strategy. Throughout the semester students will: analyze how economic, political, socio-cultural, geographical, and technological differences can impact a company’s global market strategies; develop an understanding of consumers in global and comparative contexts; analyze how country differences can impact a company’s global strategies; and, formulate strategies appropriate for competing in different countries. Students will have the opportunity to develop their skills in effective cross-cultural communication, while enhancing their knowledge of the social responsibility factors associated with issues of consumption and analyzing contemporary consumer culture. Through a mixture of lectures, multimedia presentations, and group activities, students will develop a much-desired awareness of the importance of both financial and social objectives for businesses.

AMID-R490 Omnichannel Apparel Merchandising (3 Credit Hours)
Fall

Professor Ashley Hasty
Renamed AMID-R350 - Fall 2014

Omnichannel Apparel Merchandising is a survey of social media theories and models as they relate to apparel merchandising. This course will explore social media strategies used by corporations to establish connections with customers and consultants. This exploration includes techniques for creating and critiquing social media strategies and standards. Why does Michael Kors have 873,353 followers on Twitter? Why is Old Navy following 2,806 fellow tweeters? Why does Burberry have over 11.6 million followers on Facebook? Why did Tiffany release a free iPhone app complete with three Instagram-like photo filters to share images to be featured on their internet site and in a Facebook Album? Why does clothing retailer Charlotte Russe have a weekly trivia contest on Twitter? Why did Louis Vuitton broadcast its spring 2010 ready-to-wear show live exclusively to Facebook followers? The answer? Connections. Social media has transformed the way that clothing is marketed and sold and will continue to play an important role in the expansion of the fashion industry in connection with the seasons, trends, and demands of an expanding customer base. This course will provide the student with the ability to critique the current techniques being implemented by retail businesses, culminating in a self-directed research project questioning the role of a particular social media tool.

AMID-C480 The Rural Post-Industrial (1 credit hour)
September 6th, 7th, 8th, & 13th

Professor Kevin Lair
Available at Graduate Level as AMID-C580

Many urban post-industrial sites have been reclaimed by the “creative class” and turned into vibrant
communities, public parks, live/work spaces, galleries, and museums. Such a harvest is made possible by the availability of cheap, often degraded, real estate, but it is also made possible by the ability of artists, architects and designers to imagine marginalized, fallow places as sites to cultivate. Rural sites, on the other hand, though valued as retreats, are rarely ever explored as post-industrial sites for creative intervention. They may appear to lack the creative frisson of densely populated mega-cities, informal settlements and refugee camps. The rural areas of the Midwest, in particular, are rarely considered places of discovery, tension and conflict, but rather are regarded with a meager palette of nostalgia, disdain, or disinterest. The rural landscape, however, has never been the place it is typically conceived to be. It is every bit as post-industrial as the urban landscape, having been either directly used for industrial production or having experienced ecological effects resulting from industrialization. We will claim the post-industrial rural landscape as a place with great conceptual and material fecundity ripe for exploration and discovery. The course challenges participants to find
and explore the connective tissue binding rural and urban worlds and to create modes that speak from a rural landscape to both rural and urban audiences.

AMID-C480 Non-Human (1 credit hour)
October 25th, 26th, 27th & November 1st

Professor Kevin Lair
Available at Graduate Level as AMID-C580

All animals have some relationship with humans such as the active and directed relationship with domesticated livestock; however, even recently discovered animals that live far below the earth’s surface have provided insights into what is required for life and potential healthcare applications. We are always seeking knowledge, hoping for some application in our own lives, and creating potential changes in the lives of non-humans. These desires and our relationship with the non-human is defined most significantly by the challenge of communication. The creatures who lack a voice with which we can directly communicate force us to be creative, inventive, persistent, empathic, and compassionate in order to learn from them. Inevitably, seeking insight into the lives of the non-human brings human existence and relationships into question. Where are the point/s of differentiation and are they fabricated to suit particular purposes or do they fundamentally have meaning?

AMID-C580 The Fear of Empty Space (1 credit hour)
November 8th, 9th, 10th, & 15th

Professor Kevin Lair
Available at Undergraduate Level as AMID-C480

The Fear of Empty space, or Horror Vacui, references those moments that snap us into awareness if only for a brief time. We suddenly feel the complexity, power, and impact of seemingly invisible, small scale, emergent phenomena in nature as a pattern takes shape for us. The impact of nature and what we often think are not much more than "raw" materials for our purposes can be experienced as having a capacity and vibrancy that engages us in profound ways. However, we have to unlearn common ways and seek a more meaningful, thoughtful relationship with what Jane Bennet calls "vibrant matter." With this realization, it is hard to be proscriptive or dogmatic about action, inaction, causes, preventions, or solutions. It does compel us to explore, search, and question our relationship with the environment. Also noted by Bennet is the long list of thinkers who understood the need to create the right context in which a moral set of principles can be lived out. Artists also seek to create ways we can better see the hidden patterns, relationships, and significance in our world. In this workshop, we will advocate for the vibrancy of matter through creative inquiry. We will focus our inquiry on the "fear of an empty space" or ways in which nature operates and ways in which we have enabled, initiated, fostered, thwarted, challenged, and ignored.

 

Spring 2014 Offerings:

AMID-D201 3D Modeling in Design & Digital Fabrication (3 Credit Hours)
Spring

Professor Jon Racek
3D Modeling in Design and Digital Fabrication is concerned with the visualization and creation of 3-D computer-generated models and their applications in today’s manufacturing, communication, and publishing industries; students will also examine studio methods for solving 3D geometric problems from technical drawings and models. Students will create free-form curves, surfaces, and solids employed in interior design, fashion design, furniture design and digital fabrication using software such as Rhinoceros NURBS and digital fabrication equipment. In a laboratory setting, students will have an opportunity to practice the strategies and methods commonly used in creating and solving 2-D and 3-D geometric problems. In addition to developing a working knowledge of 3-D terminology and concepts, each student will learn how to create a variety of 3-D geometric models from technical drawings, sketches, real models, and written descriptions. Students can continue beyond modeling; models can be exported to a CNC machine for prototyping, manufacturing, or render the model and use it on Web pages, newsletters, and presentations.

AMID-D202 Interior Visualization (3 Credit Hours)
Spring

Professor Jiangmei Wu

Interior Visualization is a studio drawing course focusing on creative/inventive sketching and rendering. A variety of presentation skills, freehand drawing techniques and digital editing techniques will be explored. Students will learn to use the language of drawing, as well as composition and creative design, both by hand and by digital techniques, to improve the process of conceptual design, design development, visualization, and communication. Tonal studies, colors, material, textures, and lighting will be used to develop hand-drawn renderings and interior spaces. Skills will be refined in drawing floor plans, elevations, and perspective renderings.

AMID-D480 Owen Hall Project 2 (3 Credit Hours)
Spring

Professor T. Kelly Wilson

Owen Hall is the new location for the Dean’s offices of the College of Arts and Sciences on the IUB campus, moving from their former location within Kirkwood Hall. With this new location, the College occupies a building that has no outward, or internal, expression that would identify the building with the uniqueness of the College and its departments. Also, within the College, a significant portion of the arts at IUB are to found, from fine arts to design and media. The expression of departmental, or programmatic, identity to the buildings of the IUB campus is typically achieved by the placement of words, either carved or attached to either the building or by a plague located on the building surface, on the grounds before the building, and within the lobby and offices. Identity in this case is literal, as in the naming of the departmental program, such as “Chemistry”. Less transparent to its program, a building may be named after a donor, a remarkable individual from IUB history, or serve to be in testimony to an ideal, such as “Memorial Hall”. The identity of a department or program is also expressed without words by the power of association. Alexander Calder’s great red stabile sculpture on the lawn before the performing arts center (MAC) serves to tell us that a significant artistic enterprise is associated with this location, and without specifying which form of artistic enterprise is present - we have to engage the building and read the ‘signage’ to deduce the artistic venue. As a collaborative-design team, artists and designers will meet together on a regular academic schedule to discuss the issues surrounding the design problem before them, submitting their proposals to continuous review and evaluation.

AMID-R490 International Fashion Consumer: Retailers (3 Credit Hours)
Spring

Professor Sharron Lennon

International Fashion Consumer: Retailers will focus on global and country specific factors that impact distribution systems for and consumption of fashion related products. In this course, students will develop an understanding of consumers of fashion products within a global context and motivations for pursuing a global marketing and retailing strategy. Throughout the semester students will: analyze how economic, political, socio-cultural, geographical, and technological differences can impact a company’s global market strategies; develop an understanding of consumers in global and comparative contexts; analyze how country differences can impact a company’s global strategies; and, formulate strategies appropriate for competing in different countries. Students will have the opportunity to develop their skills in effective cross-cultural communication, while enhancing their knowledge of the social responsibility factors associated with issues of consumption and analyzing contemporary consumer culture. Through a mixture of lectures, multimedia presentations, and group activities, students will develop a much-desired awareness of the importance of both financial and social objectives for businesses.

AMID-C280 Inter-woven Design, the art of the city (3 credit hours)
Spring

Professor T. Kelly Wilson

The city is an entity that has been host to many great individuals, institutions and aspirations, often culminating in the works of designers who, with great patience and consummate skill, create intense, complex and highly integrated ideas of art, urbanism architecture, and landscape. This course will set out to introduce the student to the body of concepts and practices that define a comprehensive-design imagination and multivalent design expressed by designers within the form of the city. The architectural virtues and historical importance of integrative designs within cities are often documented and accessible but their significance to the city as they enter into a dialogue of context, both the context of buildings and ideas, remains accessible primarily through experience. This seminar will include site visits within the context of the city of Columbus, IN, to observe, analyze and draw from the complex configuration of modern buildings the ideas that lead to the creation of multivalent form in design. Direct experience, represented through drawing and observation, assisted by introductions to the city from resident historians and architects will help to create knowledge useful to the understanding of comprehensive design.

AMID-C380/D476 Columbus Studio (3 credit hours)
Spring

Professor Mary Embry
Professor Marleen Newman

This integrated course attempts to broaden the traditional educational experience of the AMID student by employing interdisciplinary teams to explore the boundaries and intersections of design as they relate to Merchandising, Fashion, Interior Design and the extended built environment of Columbus, Indiana. The class will provide students with unique opportunities to synthesize approaches from each of the three disciplines and to work with faculty members from these diverse areas. As a “living laboratory”, Columbus will serve as the inspiration for the development of issue oriented design questions and solutions. Columbus has a strong commitment to innovation, civic investment and entrepreneurship. The city has unique resources in public education, art, and architecture. Regional industries in healthcare, advanced manufacturing and tourism are supported through grants and local initiatives as areas for growth. Columbus is committed to developing a design culture that is interdisciplinary, rooted in community engagement and indispensable to overcoming obstacles and creating unexpected opportunities. By investigating Columbus, students will learn to assess and identify patterns of social practice and change and to communicate those patterns through design and collaborative work. Students will complete a short, intensive project and a longer, quasi-capstone project. Special emphasis is placed on the students’ abilities to articulate a well-founded strategy and to assess the most appropriate forms of response. Students will familiarize themselves with the design process for complex projects done by collaborative teams. They will examine workflow and process in order to build a sound foundation for creating innovative solutions. This class is intended to be an intensive, active learning project, requiring significant effort in the planning, implementation, and presentation of a substantial final product.

AMID-C480 Wicked Problems (1 credit hour)
January 18th, 19th, 20th

Professor Kevin Lair
Available at Graduate Level as AMID-C580

Design thinking is the application of design sensibilities and methods regardless of the subject or context. This term has gained wide interest in business and other areas as a driver for innovation and business growth. Design disciplines should be applied appropriately in the service of “rule bending innovation” as asserted by Marty Neumeir. The core competency of design is in the service of addressing what Horst and Rittel defined as “wicked problems”. “Wicked problems” are complex, dynamic and contextual. This course introduces the concepts of design innovations and wicked problems. One day will be devoted to our “living lab” Columbus, Indiana during a full day immersion in the community. Students will be introduced to historic commitment of the Columbus community to design and innovation. In addition, current efforts including the new Institute for Coalition Building and the Innovation Center at Columbus Regional Health will be explored. The culmination of the workshop will be a presentation to Columbus community leaders. The presentation will demonstrate design innovation to address a current wicked problem. The second workshop will introduce the wicked problem of creating affordable, accessible and sustainable healthcare for all. One of the primary goals to healthcare is to develop preventive care and patient-centric models. Patients who take greater shared responsibility can greatly lower the cost and improve health outcomes. The patient-centric model is based on healthcare providers giving patients the support, information and motivational tools to adhere to medical needs and healthy lifestyles. This is also referred to as “personal health management” (PHM)

AMID-C480 Personal Health Management (1 credit hour)
February 15th, 16th, and 17th

Professor Kevin Lair
Available at Graduate Level as AMID-C580

Personal Health Management will introduce the wicked problem of creating affordable, accessible and sustainable healthcare for all. One of the primary goals of healthcare is to develop preventive care and patient-centric models. Patients who take greater shared responsibility can
greatly lower the cost and improve health outcomes. The patient-centric model is based on healthcare providers giving patients the support, information and motivational tools to adhere to medical needs and healthy lifestyles. This is also referred to as “personal health management” (PHM). The Innovation Center at Columbus Regional Health (CRH) - CRH are experts in healthcare delivery and through their new Innovation Center will be pursuing new ways that expand and enhance how healthcare is provided to the people in the region. CRH will be our community partners for this workshop as we use design thinking in the context of healthcare. The “wickedness” of personal health management is based on the complexity of shifting business models, coordinating diverse stakeholders, adopting new practices, and supporting behavior change that is customized for each individual. The culmination of the workshop will be a presentation to CRH leaders. The presentation will demonstrate design innovation to address personal health management.

AMID-C580 mHealth and WiGiT (1 credit hour)
April 5th, 6th, 7th

Professor Kevin Lair
Available at Undergraduate Level as AMID-C480

In the Health Institutes publication “Healthcare Unwired” the potential of mobile health (mHealth) is described: “mobile health could provide needed connections: for patients who delay care because they’re too busy to wait in a doctor’s office; for physicians who don’t have enough time to spend with patients; for device companies that want to monitor the performance of their devices; for pharmaceutical companies that want to ensure patients are taking the medicines they need; for hospitals that don’t have the capital to build more beds.” Our focus in Design Innovations [mHealth and WiGiT] will be creating a regional system for personal health management leveraging the potential of mHealth. mHealth and PHM face the challenge of how to share private information and bridge between professional and non-professional care communities. We will explore the potential of secure sharing of any digital device, application or resource through the innovation of Wireless Grids. The Wireless Grids Innovation Testbed (WiGiT) is an organization composed of many schools, businesses and government groups to support the development of open specifications for wireless communication. Open specifications allows all digital devices to communicate to each other. Gridstream is one example of the new class of software that enables this type of communication to take place. It has been created as a demonstration software to enable future development. The culmination of the workshop will be a presentation to CRH, WiGiT and other experts. The presentation will demonstrate design innovation in advancing the potential of mHealth in the Columbus community.